New study to focus on emotional wellbeing of Arabic-speaking Australians

5 December 2012

A new study that aims to understand more about the emotional health of Australians of an Arabic-speaking background and ultimately offer more effective treatment options is being launched at Macquarie University.

Little is known about the emotional wellbeing of Australians of an Arabic-speaking background. An Australian Bureau of Statistics survey from 2007-2008 found that eight per cent of people born in North Africa or the Middle East had emotional health issues compared with 11 per cent of Australians nationwide.

The Macquarie researchers undertaking the study believe that more information is needed in this under-researched area. Working closely with key stakeholders in the Arabic-speaking community, the study will first address this gap by using a national online survey to gather more information about the emotional health of Australians of an Arabic-speaking background.

The information gathered will identify barriers to accessing treatment, help-seeking history and preferences, the opportunities and challenges of integration into the wider Australian community, the inter-generational difficulties and community preferences for how the treatment would be delivered, ie, face-to-face versus internet.

By addressing some of the barriers to treatment and identifying the types of treatment preferred, the researchers hope to develop better and more targeted services that would encourage Australians of an Arabic-speaking background to seek help when needed.

More information about the study can be found at: Rony Kayrouz on 9850 9643 or contact@ecentreclinic.org Website: www.ecentreclinic.org

Filed under: Humanities Research Social sciences

A new study that aims to understand more about the emotional health of Australians of an Arabic-speaking background and ultimately offer more effective treatment options is being launched at Macquarie University.

A new study that aims to understand more about the emotional health of Australians of an Arabic-speaking background and ultimately offer more effective treatment options is being launched at Macquarie University.

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